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BTN LiveBIG: Best of … Purdue

At Purdue University, the sky is hardly the limit. The school, colloquially known as “Astronaut U,” is regarded as one of the top institutions globally for future stars in aerospace engineering, aviation and space exploration. It’s also one of the best universities for computer science, education and entrepreneurship. Below, we’re featuring some of the brightest recent LiveBIG stories to come out of West Lafayette. Boiler up! Purdue Space Day aims to inspire astronauts of tomorrow Boiler up, up and away at the Hangar of the Future   [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVbOQQEIDkw%5D Purdue partners with second graders on space science project Kids get

BTN LiveBIG: Boiler up, up and away at the Hangar of the Future

During football and basketball games, BTN LiveBIG will spotlight notable examples of research, innovation and community service from around the conference. In-Game stories will provide more background on these features, and the opportunity to view the videos again. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVbOQQEIDkw&w=560&h=315%5D For most people, having airplanes constantly taking off and landing close by wouldn’t make for ideal learning conditions. But for Purdue University grad student Amadou Anne, it’s heaven. “It’s just great to just be in this environment, especially if you like planes, like I do,” said Anne, who’s studying aerospace and aviation management at Purdue’s Hangar of the Future. “I

BTN LiveBIG: Purdue helps flight students with disabilities soar on wings of confidence

Just a few years ago, Wes Major didn’t know he could fly. The Wilmington, Del., native lost the use of his legs in a motorcycle accident at the age of 20, and his dream of learning how to pilot an aircraft seemed like something that would be forever out of reach. But after hearing about the Able Flight program at Purdue University, which helps people with physical disabilities learn how to fly, Major drove his adapted car more than 700 miles from his home to the school’s campus in West Lafayette, Ind., in the summer of 2012. “I didn’t fly