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Today
4:00 PMBowling Green at Michigan St.Watch
7:00 PMSIUE at Ohio St.Watch
7:30 PMButler at IndianaWatch
7:30 PMDetroit Mercy at MichiganWatch
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Tomorrow
4:00 PMMaryland at Michigan St.Watch
Friday Sep 30
2:30 PMNorthwestern at Rutgers Watch
3:00 PMIowa at IndianaWatch

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Latest BTN Videos

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Mark Emmert

Penn State Links: National Voices Sound Off

Mark Emmert and the NCAA came down hard on Penn State on Monday. The penalties were as severe as we’ve ever seen in college athletics, ranging from a $60 million fine to a four-year postseason ban. Read the AP story on all of the NCAA sanctions. As expected, the national media had much to say about the penalties and what they mean for the future of Penn State football. You can find a collection of reaction stories in this post. [BTN.com: Penn State football family reacts to sanctions on Twitter] [VIDEO: Watch all of BTN.com’s Penn State video segments] CBSSports.com:

Bill O'Brien

O'Brien, Penn State Athletics React

Acting Penn State athletic director Dave Joyner and Penn State football coach Bill O’Brien released statements Monday reacting to Monday’s news from the NCAA. Joyner stressed the importance of begin entrusted with young people while O’Brien stressed he is committed to Penn State for the long term. Joyner said in part: “Working together, the path ahead will not be easy. But it is necessary, just, and will bring a better future. Our faculty, staff, students, athletes, and parents will work together as Penn State begins this new chapter. Through this cooperation and collaboration, Penn State will become a national model

Penn State logo

Twitter: Track Reaction to Penn State Sanctions

NCAA president Mark Emmert handed down Penn State’s punishment for the school’s child sex-abuse scandal and coverup allegations Monday morning in Indianapolis. The punishments were stiff, to say the least. Among them: a $60 million fine and a four-year postseason ban. Read AP story. [BTN.com: Penn State football family reacts to sanctions] [VIDEO: Watch all of BTN.com’s Penn State video segments] Penn State put on five years probation — Brett McMurphy (@McMurphyESPN) July 23, 2012 Penn State must reduce 10 initial scholarships and 20 total scholarships each year for four years. — Bryan Fischer (@BryanDFischer) July 23, 2012 NCAA penalties:

NCAA president Mark Emmert speaks at a press conference in preparation for the 2012 Final Four of the division I men's basketball tournament at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Mandatory Credit: Tyler Kaufman-US PRESSWIRE

NCAA Penalties Coming for Penn State Football

The NCAA announced that it will levy “corrective and punitive measures” against Penn State in the wake of the child sex-abuse scandal and coverup allegations, and those measures will be spelled out in a 9 a.m. ET Monday press conference with NCAA President Mark Emmert and Ed Ray, the chairman of the NCAA’s executive committee (read more details here). BTN & BTN2Go will air live coverage starting at 8:55 a.m. ET with Dave Revsine and our studio team in Chicago, Mike Hall and Tom Dienhart (@BTNTomDienhart) in Indianapolis for the news conference, and Rick Pizzo on the Penn State campus

Penn State logo

NCAA: 'Corrective' Measures for Penn State

The NCAA says it will levy “corrective and punitive measures” against Penn State in the wake of the child sex-abuse scandal involving former football assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. The NCAA announced Sunday that it will detail the sanctions on Monday. It disclosed no details. Read more from The Associated Press. Emmert as recently as last week would not rule out the possibility of shutting down the Penn State football program in the wake of the scandal, adding that he had “never seen anything as egregious.” [Tom Dienhart: Remember lessons, not statue] Source: No "death penalty" for Penn State but "significant,

Joe Paterno statue

Dienhart: Remember Lessons, Not Statue

It’s a simple mantra that we all should live by: Do the right thing. Joe Paterno didn’t do it. But the decision makers at Penn State are by opting to remove the Paterno statue. Thank you. Oh, the JoePa bootlickers, apologists and loyalists rallied around the statue of their false god, worshiping Paterno in some sort of twisted religious fashion. The sycophants guarded their bronzed deity and laid flowers at its feet, adorning the area around it with signs of support. Pathetic. Just like Paterno. The larger-than-life likeness of Paterno jogging with his right hand in the air with index

wall2

Video Gallery: Removing Joe Paterno's Statue

BTN aired a live special report Sunday on the removal of the Joe Paterno statue after airing a special report earlier in the morning. Dave Revsine and Gerry DiNardo were in studio, Rick Pizzo was in State College, and they were joined by Tom Dienhart, Glen Mason, and Howard Griffith by phone. Here’s a collection of videos from our Sunday coverage on a day when workers lifted the 7-foot-tall statue off its base and used a forklift to move it into Beaver Stadium as the 100 to 150 students watching chanted, “We are Penn State.” [Tom Dienhart: Remember lessons, not

Joe Paterno

Paterno Family Issues Statement

The family of the late Joe Paterno has issued a statement in reaction to the removal of the statue honoring the former Penn State football coach. The statement read in part: “Tearing down the statue of Joe Paterno does not serve the victims of Jerry Sandusky’s horrible crimes or help heal the Penn State Community. We believe the only way to help the victims is to uncover the full truth.” The full statement reads: “Tearing down the statue of Joe Paterno does not serve the victims of Jerry Sandusky’s horrible crimes or help heal the Penn State Community. We believe

A statue of Joe Paterno

Penn State President Orders Paterno Statue Removal

Penn State University will remove the famed statue of Joe Paterno outside its football stadium, eliminating a key piece of the iconography surrounding the once-sainted football coach accused of burying child sex abuse allegations against a retired assistant. The university said Sunday that it will take down the larger-than-life monument in the face of an investigative report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh that found the late coach, along with three top Penn State administrators, concealed the abuse claims against Jerry Sandusky more than a decade ago in order to shield the university and its football program from negative publicity.

Michigan State's Le'Veon Bell

Reader Mail: Can Spartans drop Wolverines again?

You have questions. And, of course, I have answers. It’s time for my latest Big Ten Mailbag and my readers brought some solid questions this week. What’s on your mind? Football, naturally. In this week’s edition, I’m asked if Michigan State can continue its dominance over instate rival Michigan and if a Big Ten city could bid for the national championship game? See all of my answers to your questions in this post. And, as always, thanks for all of the questions! Please tell me that Indiana will beat Indiana State in the season opener? – Ben You have to