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BTN LiveBIG: Illinois faculty achievements add up to big impact

Imagine you’re highly skilled in software coding or the finer aspects of machine learning. You’d be a sought-after commodity in today’s employment market, and the odds of finding a fulfilling job that allows you to make a good living would be pretty good. Now imagine you live in Kenya or Bangladesh. Though there might be opportunities available to you in those countries, it’s just as likely that you’ll find yourself in a job in which you’re over-skilled or doing something completely removed from your talents. Furthermore, there are many others in a similar situation throughout the country, creating a ripple

BTN LiveBIG: University of Illinois finds fit bodies equal fit brains

If movies like “Revenge of the Nerds” are to be believed, one of the things that has long separated the brainy from the brawny is the latter’s participation in sports and other regular physical activity. While there may be some truth to that stereotype, professors at the University of Illinois recently found that 9- and 10-year-olds who have good cardiorespiratory health — usually the product of regular exercise — tend to have “thinner” grey matter in their brains than their less-fit counterparts. Thinning of the outermost layer of brain cells and blood vessels in the cerebrum is associated with better

BTN LiveBIG: For Indiana researcher, math reveals 'devils' in the details

Anyone who’s commuted in traffic in a major U.S. city or tried to get their children out the door for school can claim to have some familiarity with the concept of “controlled chaos.” Simply put, this phrase refers to the often random, unpredictable interactions and events that can hinder or even halt complex, critical systems. Indiana University professor and researcher Filippo Radicchi recently devised a mathematical framework to analyze these scenarios. His approach is designed to improve the resilience of intricate systems such as air traffic control networks and power grids by figuring out how they might break down before