Menu Search

WATCH: The latest on-demand video from around the Big Ten

BTN Plus on BTN2Go

BTN Plus on BTN2Go

all times ET
Tomorrow
4:00 PMGeorge Mason at MarylandWatch
4:00 PME. Michigan at Michigan St.Watch
6:00 PMChicago St. at PurdueWatch
6:30 PME. Michigan at Michigan St.Watch
7:00 PMBradley at IllinoisWatch
Wednesday Apr 25
3:00 PMSt. Peter's at RutgersWatch
3:00 PMToledo at Michigan St.Watch
4:00 PMJames Madison at MarylandWatch

Watch hundreds of live non-televised Big Ten events via BTN Plus on BTN2Go.

Latest electronics News

BTN LiveBIG: At Illinois, more sustainable electronics aren't an impossible mission

During football and basketball games, BTN LiveBIG will spotlight notable examples of research, innovation and community service from around the conference. In-Game stories will provide more background on these features, and the opportunity to view the videos again. Conventional wisdom says that the best way to make a product more sustainable is eliminate or reduce the need for it to be replaced. But there isn’t anything conventional about the work engineer Scott White and his team do in this space. “We’ve been focused on making things last longer,” said White, a professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Illinois.

BTN LiveBIG: Northwestern duo's engineering tech becomes a viral hit

In this day and age, the Internet regularly creates overnight sensations. Seemingly obscure, novel people and products can collect thousands of backers, customers and fans in a matter of hours if they attract the right kind of attention on sites like YouTube, Kickstarter, Twitter and Facebook. Northwestern University instructor and inventor Nick Marchuk benefited from this phenomenon when the nScope, a device he developed with fellow NU lecturer David Meyer, went viral in late 2013. Interestingly, the product took off when the website Hackaday featured a different tool developed by Northwestern engineering professor Michael Peshkin. A version of the NScope

BTN LiveBIG: Nebraska researchers improve digital memory technology

Computers, smartphones, tablets, gaming systems. In a short period of time — in some cases, a span of just a couple of years — we’ve gone from marveling at these devices to demanding that companies make them better, faster, more portable. Research from a team of scientists at the University of Nebraska could give the people what they want, and then some. Their work has the potential to significantly improve the speed, capacity and dependability of device memory through the use of what are called “ferroelectric tunnel junctions.” As explained by Dr. Alexei Gruverman, a Nebraska physics professor and co-author