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Week 1 Polls: Before the 2016 season kicks off Thursday night, pick your Week 1 Big Ten winners.

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all times ET
Friday Sep 2
12:30 PMW. Illinois at IowaWatch
3:00 PMLSU at IndianaWatch
4:00 PMPepperdine at MarylandWatch
7:00 PMGeorgetown at Rutgers Watch
7:00 PMIowa St. at NebraskaWatch
7:30 PMGeorgetown at MarylandWatch
8:00 PMSan Diego at WisconsinWatch
8:00 PMArizona St. at IowaWatch

Watch hundreds of live non-televised Big Ten events via BTN Plus on BTN2Go.

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BTN Plus on BTN2Go

BTN Plus on BTN2Go

all times ET
Friday Sep 2
12:30 PMW. Illinois at IowaWatch
3:00 PMLSU at IndianaWatch
4:00 PMPepperdine at MarylandWatch
7:00 PMGeorgetown at Rutgers Watch
7:00 PMIowa St. at NebraskaWatch
7:30 PMGeorgetown at MarylandWatch
8:00 PMSan Diego at WisconsinWatch
8:00 PMArizona St. at IowaWatch

Watch hundreds of live non-televised Big Ten events via BTN Plus on BTN2Go.

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Video: Michigan CF Jackson Glines makes another highlight-reel catch

Jackson Glines strikes again! [ MORE: View the official NCAA tournament bracket ] Just last week, in Michigan’s Big Ten tourney opener vs. Indiana, the center fielder sprinted back toward the fence to make a highlight-reel grab that earned #BTNStandout honors. Well, in Friday afternoon’s NCAA tournament opener vs. Bradley, Glines made an equally impressive, and rather similar, catch. Watch the catch above and relive Glines’ Big Ten tourney highlight in the tweet below. [ MORE: Video: Indiana turns rarest of rare triple plays ] #BTNStandout alert: @umichbaseball CF Jackson Glines goes back, leaves his feet, and makes an incredible

Michigan adds Germany big man Moritz Wagner to signing class

John Beilein announced Friday the signing of 6-foot-10 German forward Moritz Wagner to a National Letter of Intent. Wagner will join the Wolverines for the 2015-16 academic year. “Moe is a long and versatile player,” Beilein said in a team release. “He has a great understanding of the game with a tremendous upside. As a product of Germany, he has always played against men five to even 10 years older than him, which has only helped his growth as a player.” A Berlin native, Wagner played 18 games in his second season with ALBA Berlin in 2014-15, averaging 16.8 points,

Tom Dienhart's top 5 2015 Big Ten non-conference games

I recently ranked Big Ten non-conference schedules. Now, in a three-part series, I'm going to take a look at some of the best and worst of the non-league schedule this fall.

Urban Meyer: Braxton Miller's 'playing for Ohio State' this fall

As football season draws nearer and Braxton Miller remains at Ohio State, it continues to look more and more like the Buckeyes will have a three-man quarterback competition. Speaking to the media Friday, Urban Meyer said that he expects Miller to stay in Columbus for his final season of eligibility. He should know, because that’s what the 2012 and 2013 Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year has told him. Rumors have linked Miller to a few other programs as a graduate transfer, however the quarterback keeps telling anybody who asks that he isn’t going anywhere. Should Miller remain with

Big Ten links: SEC's gripe with satellite camps, Rutgers' win total & more

The SEC’s hissy fit over satellite camps is making it look a bit absurd, says Nick Baumgardner of Mive.com. “If we’re going to compete for the championship and everybody is going to play in the playoff system and everybody is going to compete for that, we need to get our rules in alignment so we’re all on a level playing field, whether they’re transfer rules, whether they’re satellite camp rules,” Alabama coach Nick Saban told reporters this week in Florida. “It’s a disadvantage not to be able to do something in one league and be able to do it in

BTN LiveBIG: Nebraska research team leads charge to create small surgical robots

Some of humankind’s greatest achievements have been rendered in science fiction before they became science fact. Moonwalks, artificial intelligence, earbuds, electric cars — all were the stuff of someone’s wildest dreams until hard work, ingenuity and perseverance turned them into realities. What’s next? How about small surgical robots that perform practically painless operations on people, along the same lines of the microscopic medical team that heals a patient by traveling into his body in Fantastic Voyage? If miniature versions of R2-D2 wielding teeny scalpels seem far-fetched, think again. At the University of Nebraska, Shane Farritor, alumnus and current professor of